Quiz: Which Christmas Fairy are You?

 

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As Yuletide continues, so the fairies of winter continue to entice and enchant us with their holiday magic.  Shakespeare had Peaseblossom, Mustardseed, Titania and Puck. But did you know that your life path number, combined with your personal proclivities and most cherished Christmas traditions can earn you a fairy title as well?

Which magical Christmas fairy are you? Take this quiz to find out!

Magical Fairy Quiz

 ** A note about calculating your Life Path Number: It’s super easy! Just add up all the numbers in your date of birth and reduce them to a single digit.  For example, a person born on April 1, 1999 would add 4 (as April is the 4th month) plus 1, plus 1999.

4 + 1 + 1 + 9 + 9 + 9 = 33.    3 + 3 = 6. This person’s Life Path Number is 6.

Does your fairy name fit you? Let me know in the comments below!

 

Mine was:

 Aqua Sparkleflip!

You’re a sweet, compassionate little fairy who wants the BEST for everybody involved!   Your gift of enchantment is bringing everybody together and whispering words of balance and harmony through the air.   You are loving, loyal and trustworthy, and everybody knows they can count on you to bring your purity and charm to the festive table!
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Have a blessed and brilliant Yuletide.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Krampusnacht!

 

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Have you been naughty or nice? If you have been naughty you’d better watch out!  In punishment for your nasty behavior, your holiday season just may be stained with the grimy patina of that famous Christmas devil known as… (drum roll please)

KRAMPUS!

Beware tonight, December 5th, as he comes to visit!

Who is Krampus, you ask?  He is, of course, the goat-footed companion of Saint Nicholas. Together they work in a good cop/ bad cop fashion to reward and punish children (and maybe adults?) for kind as well as naughty deeds. The benevolent will receive candy and gifts. The not-so-nice will receive coal and may get carried off to hell in Krampus’ sack.

Originating in Germanic mythology, Krampus celebrations have long been part of Bavarian traditions. For Krampuskarten (Krampus cards), greeting cards are exchanged with the heading Gruss vom Krampus (Greetings from Krampus). The cards often feature humorous poems and Krampus himself looming menacingly over frightened children.

For Krampuslauf (Krampus Run), men wear scary-looking horned masks and run through town terrorizing people. These villains have been known to kidnap a Fraulein or two while they are at it, so ladies beware!

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As a dark alternative to Saint Nicholas Day, Krampusnacht is quickly gaining popularity in many parts of the world, including the US.  Sound intriguing? If so, you might want to initiate a Krampus celebration of your own. It would be great fun, a chance to wear costumes and conduct all kinds of irreverent activities! (Because Halloween is long past and we can never get enough of this stuff, right?)

Do you celebrate this weird festival?  Let me know what you think of it.

To learn more about Krampus, his history and his growing fan base, please watch the following (very short) documentary. (Running time about 7 minutes.)

Hope you enjoy it, and Happy Krampusnacht!

 

 

 

Good King Wenceslas

 

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The legend of King Wenceslas takes place on the 26th of December, which is also the Feast of Saint Stephen (and Kwanzaa and Boxing Day!)

The real life Wenceslas was a Duke of Bohemia in the 10th century. Legend has it that on one particularly cold December 26th, he looked out his palace window and happened to see a peasant gathering firewood. Taken aback, Wenceslas realized that while he himself feasted in the luxury of his palace, the poor peasant lived in abject poverty and had little to be festive about.

Wenceslas questioned his young Page as to where the peasant might live. The Page knew immediately, “Right against the forest fence, by Saint Agnes fountain.”  Wenceslas then insisted the two go out in the cold winter night, bringing meat and wine to  the peasant so he too could have a good dinner.

Unfortunately, the little Page was not built very sturdily. Halfway through the journey his body went numb and his pulse weak. “Fails my heart, I know not why, I can go no longer,” he told his master.  Wenceslas instructed the Page to walk behind him in his footsteps as he trudged  the snow. When the Page did so, the cold miraculously left his body.

Wenceslas and the Page completed their journey, brought food to the peasant and did indeed see him dine.  Ever after that, Wenceslas (who also became a saint) reminded his subjects that  “You who now shall bless the poor, shall yourself find blessings.”

‘Good King Wenceslas’ is one of my favorite carols, performed here by the Mediaeval Baebes.  Hope you like it and hope you are having a fantastic Feast of Stephen, Kwanzaa, Boxing Day and day after Christmas!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gift of the Magi

 

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Three wise magicians, who resided in ancient Persia, were so adept at astrological charts that they determined the presence of a brilliant constellation, linked to the birth of baby who would become the most radical and controversial figure to ever hit planet earth.

That baby, a male child called Yeshua bin Joseph, was born in Bethlehem to a Hebrew teenager named Mary and  her betrothed, Joseph of the House of David.

The three magicians rode on caravan across the desert to discover the child for themselves, and determine what may be his effects on humankind.  They stopped for a brief stint with the (very nosy) King Herod.

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They then went on to Bethlehem where they greeted the baby with gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh.  Although they had promised Herod they would return with a full report, they bypassed the palace and returned to Persia, wisely keeping knowledge of the baby to themselves.

The Gift of the Magi is one of my favorite biblical stories. Today, in honor of Christmas Eve, I give you ‘We Three Kings’ by the (fabulous!) Mediaeval Baebes.

Make a wish, count your lucky stars and have a magical Christmas!